Last edited by Dijin
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

3 edition of A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride found in the catalog.

A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride

T. H

A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride

shewing the unlawfulnesse of any outward adorning of any attire of haire, either in laying forth the haire, or in crisping of the haire, or in broidered haire in all women, but especially in godly women declared fully by the scripture : also those scriptures and carnall objections answered which are seemingly made for it

by T. H

  • 218 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Printed for R. W. in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hairdressing -- Early works to 1800

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesA spie for pride, A looking glasse for women
    SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 228:E.2, no. 18
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination[6], 10 p
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15025459M

    Full text of "The poetical works of Edmund Spenser;" See other formats. Take downe the looking glasse: here is a mirror Steelde so exactely, neither taking from Nor flattering the obiect, it returnes To the beholder, that Narcissus might (And neuer grow enamourd of himselfe:) View his fayre feature in't. Donusa. Poeticall too. Vitel. Heere China dishes to serue in a Banket, Though the volouptus Persian sate a guest.

    O while you liue, men before women: Custome hath plac'd it so. Bub. Why then Custome is not so mannerly, as I would be. Rash. Farewell M. Scatter-good: Come Louer, you're too busie heere, I must tutor yee: Cast not your eye at the table on each other, my Father will spie you without Spectacles, Hee is a shrewd obseruer: doe you heare mee? Ger. "The humble petition of Richard Lovelace, Esquire, a prisoner in the Gate-house, by a former order of this House."--JOURNALS, ii. This property, which was of considerable extent and value, was purchased of the Cheney family, toward the latter part. of the reign of Henry VI, by Richard Lovelace, of Queenhithe.

    Emma Leeson Huber MURP Added TYPEs to DIVs in order to validate. Proofed title page(s). Checked for TYPE="book". Checked s s. CHAP. I. What is meant by the name of Magick. P Orphyry and Apuleius, great Platonicks, in an Oration made in the defence of Magick, do witness, that Magick took her name and original from Persia. Tully, in his book of Divination, saith, that in the Persian language, a Magician is nothing else but one that expounds and studies divine things; and it is the general name of Wise-men in that country.


Share this book
You might also like
To the people of New-Jersey.

To the people of New-Jersey.

Who, me teach my child religion?

Who, me teach my child religion?

The Bank Street book of creepy tales

The Bank Street book of creepy tales

Western Civilization, Since 1550

Western Civilization, Since 1550

In China, 1920-1921

In China, 1920-1921

British war production.

British war production.

Managerial Economics

Managerial Economics

Parade, blues and allegro.

Parade, blues and allegro.

Key to Elementary arithmetic...

Key to Elementary arithmetic...

A funeral sermon, occasioned by the much lamented death of John Jekyll, Esq; collector of His Majestys customs for the Port of Boston, &c

A funeral sermon, occasioned by the much lamented death of John Jekyll, Esq; collector of His Majestys customs for the Port of Boston, &c

List of books and pamphlets printed in Armagh in the eighteenth century.

List of books and pamphlets printed in Armagh in the eighteenth century.

The untold story of milk

The untold story of milk

On divorce

On divorce

The crossroads of gender and century endings

The crossroads of gender and century endings

A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride by T. H Download PDF EPUB FB2

A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride: shewing the unlawfulnesse of any outward adorning of any attire of haire, either in laying forth the haire, or in crisping of the haire, or in broidered haire in all women, but especially in godly women declared fully by the scripture: also those scriptures and carnall objections answered which are seemingly made for it.

A looking-glasse for women, or, A spie for pride: shewing the unlawfulnesse of any outward adorning of any attire of haire, either in laying forth the haire, or in crisping of the haire, or in broidered haire in all women, but especially in godly women declared fully by the scripture: also those scriptures and carnall objections answered which.

Early English Books Online, or EEBO, represents one of the premier scholarly resources for scholars, teachers, and students interested in primary printed A spie for pride book of the Early Modern period, including the Scientific Revolution (Copernicus to Newton).What follows is a detailed introduction and overview of some of the holdings of EEBO.

For more on the textual history of the Great Books of Record, see Richard T. Spence, Lady Anne Clifford Countess of Pembroke, Dorset and Montgomery (–) (Phoenix Mill: Sutton, ), – D.

Clifford printed one section of the third volume of The Great Books of Record, c– as ‘The Kendal Diary’. or Katherine Acheson also edited ‘The Life of Me’ from the Great Author: Edith Snook.

Poems with the Muses looking-glasse: and Amyntas By Thomas Randolph Master of Arts, and late fellow of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge.

Author: Randolph, Thomas, University of O xford T ext A rchive. A mirrour or looking-glasse both for saints and sinners held forth in about two thousand examples wherein is presented as Gods wonderful mercies to the one, so his severe judgments against the other collected out of the most classique authors both ancient and modern with some late examples observed by my self: whereunto are added the wonders of nature and the rare.

Full text of "Second catalogue of the library of the Peabody Institute of the city of Baltimore, including the additions made since " See other formats.

Pride is his losse and corruption: it is pride that misleadeth him from common waies; that makes him to embrace all new fangles, and rather chuse to be chiefe of a straggling troupe and in the path of perdition, and be regent of some erroneous sect, and a teacher of falsehood, than a disciple in the schoole of truth, and suffer himselfe to be.

Anonymous (). A Looking-Glasse for Women, or, A Spie for Pride. Anonymous (). A Looking-Glasse of the World. A book of dravving, limning, vvashing or colouring of maps and prints. A looking glasse for the vnlearned.

EEBO-TCP. Anonymous. A Paper devlivered to His Highness the Prince of Orange by the commissioners sent by His. Anonymous (). A Looking-Glasse for Women, or, A Spie for Pride.

RE.\n. Anonymous (). A Looking-Glasse of the World. A book of dravving, limning, vvashing or colouring of maps and prints.

A panoplie of epistles, or, A looking glasse for the vnlearned. EEBO-TCP.\n. Anonymous (). A Paper devlivered to His Highness the Prince of. David M.

Hart, Tracts on Liberty by the Levellers and their Critics Vol. 1 () []. Full text of "The old book collector's miscellany; or, A collection of readable reprints of literary rarities, illustrative of the history, literature, manners, and biography of the English nation during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries" See other formats.

Pride is neuer built but vpon some pillers: and let his supporters faile him neuer so little, you shall finde him very humble in the dust.

Wit oftentimes stands in stead of a chiefe arche to vnderproppe it, in souldiers strength, in women beautie. Drudges, that haue no extraordinarie gifts of body, nor of minde, filche themselues into.

The whole Vniverse is the Looking-glasse of GODS Power, Wisdom, and Boun∣tie; HE loves as Charitie, knows as Truth, judges as Equitie, rules as Majestie, defends as Safety, works as Vertue, reveals as Light, &c.

HE is a never deficient Brightnesse, a never weary Life. The origin of vulgar superstitions is a very curious subject, which, leading us often into the most remote antiquity, lays open the early history of nations, but is generally obscure in proportion to its antiquity. Of this remark, a strong proof may be deduced from our antiquated notions about 'The faery ladies dancing on the hearth;' of which our best poets have frequently made so good an use.

CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTORY. The most interesting and important fifteen years in the records of English dramatic literature are undoubtedly those between andwithin which limit all of Shakespeare's poems and the majority of his plays were written; yet no exhaustive English history, intelligently co-ordinating the social, literary, and political life of this period, has ever been written.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare Its easy to link to paragraphs in the Full Text Archive If this page contains some material that you want to link to but you don't want your visitors to have to scroll down the whole page just hover your mouse over the relevent paragraph and click the bookmark icon that appears to the left of it.

Tracts on Liberty by the Levellers and their Critics Vol. 1 () 1st Edition (uncorrected) Note: This volume has been corrected and is available here. This volume is part of a set of 7 volumes of Leveller Tracts: Tracts on Liberty by the Levellers and their Critics (), 7 by David M.

Hart and Ross Kenyon (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, ). A two-book, sixteen-canto allegorical romance in the manner of the Faerie Queen by the Cromwellian provost of Eton College.

Francis Rous, a native of Cornwall, informs us that Thule, or Vertue's Historie was composed when he was but sixteen years of age. It appeared shortly after the publication of the second installment of the Faerie Queene. But since she did neglect her looking-glasse, And threw her Sun-expelling Masque away, The ayre hath staru'd the roses in her cheekes, And pinch'd the lilly-tincture of her face, That now she is become as blacke as I Sil.

How tall was she. Iul. About my stature: for at Pentecost, When all our Pageants of delight were plaid. J. R. (Joseph Rutter), fl.

56 dpi TIFF G4 page images University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service Ann Arbor, Michigan April (TCP phase 2) STC (2nd ed.) Greg, II, A This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text.Fraunce, Italy, The pride of the Spa∣niard.

and Spaine, are all full of these false hearted Machiuillions: but properly Pride is the disease of the Spani∣ard, who is borne a Bragart in his mothers wombe: for if he be but 17 yeeres old and hath come to the place where a was tought (though halfe a yeare before) he then talks like one of the.The loue-complaintes l of Gynecia, 2 Zelmane, 3 and Ba- silius.

4 Her, 5 and his wooing of Zelmane, and her shifting of both, 6 to bemone her selfe. N these pastorall pastimes a great number of dayes were sent to follow their flying predecessours, while the cup of poison (which was deepely tasted of this noble companie) had left no sinewe of theirs without mortally searching into it; yet neuer.